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Pasadena Water & Power

Glenarm Repowering Project

Project Description
Power Plant Location
Objectives Of The Glenarm Power Plant Repowering Project
Features and Benefits
How It Works  
Agenda Reports and Presentation 
Status  

Project Description

Pasadena Water and Power (PWP) has initiated a major project to replace an aging power generating unit with a more efficient combined cycle unit at the Glenarm Power Plant. Known as the Glenarm Power Plant Repowering Project, the installation of the new unit will allow PWP to reduce fuel consumption and emissions while increasing reliability.  The project is a key component of the 2009/2012 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP), and furthers PWP's commitment to deliver reliable, environmentally responsible electricity service at competitive rates.   

The Broadway/Glenarm Power Plant allows PWP to generate electricity as needed and provides a dependable, local electricity generating source by lessening Pasadena's reliance on outside sources for energy.  The upcoming, quick-starting and highly-efficient combined cycle unit, GT-5 will replace the aging conventional boiler/steam turbine-generating unit Broadway 3 (B-3), which has been serving Pasadena since 1965.  Of one of the major advantages of GT-5 is it's ability to startup within minutes as opposed to B-3’s 72-hour startup time.  In addition, operating GT-5 allows the City to integrate more renewable resources, enter into more cost effective electricity contracts and provides a stable, quick-start flexible source. PWP customers will enjoy the benefits of greater reliability and reduced fuel costs while we continue to lower our carbon footprint. Additional information regarding the Glenarm Repowering project can be located by clicking here
 

Local Hiring - Nov. 4 Special Recruitment Event!

The Glenarm Repowering Project will utilize a Local Participation Plan which focuses on the inclusion of local business and residents into the potential contracting and hiring opportunities.  The plan calls for 15% of the subcontracting and procurement on the project to be satisfied by Pasadena businesses; and 25% of the payroll to be satisfied by Pasadena residents. The local subcontracting and procurement component is facilitated through a good-faith effort.  The local hiring component is facilitated through a Project Labor Agreement with the Los Angeles and Orange County Construction and Building Trades.   

On Nov. 4, 2014, The City is promoting a “Special Recruitment” effort for Pasadena residents interested in working the unions involved on the Glenarm Repowering Project. This recruitment will be held at the Jackie Robinson Community Center 1020 N. Fair Oaks Ave starting at 8:30 a.m. The following unions will be represented at the event: Carpenters, Cement Masons, and Pipe Fitters. The recruitment will give Pasadena residents the opportunity to learn about the unions’ apprenticeship programs and application/enrollment processes. Residents who have questions, should contact one of the participating unions. More details and union contact information are available here.

Through the Project Labor Agreement between ARB, Inc., and the Los Angeles and Orange County Building and Construction trades, the City was able to secure a local hiring goal of 25% of the certified payroll for the project. Separately, there is a goal of 15% local subcontracting and procurement. As of October 10, 2014, Pasadena residents account for 32.5% of the reported certified payroll, and Pasadena businesses account for 27.3% or $451,208 of the total contracting and procurement.  

Project Status

 

Power Plant Location

The City of Pasadena’s power plant is located on a 14 acre site in the southwestern portion of the City. The site consists of two groups of generating facilities bisected by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) Gold Line tracks: the Glenarm Plant to the west of the Gold Line and the Broadway Plant to the east.  



Objectives Of The Glenarm Power Plant Repowering Project

  • Maintain the City’s ability to generate power locally, when needed, to make up for an electricity shortfall resulting from import or distribution system limits;
  • Reduce operating, maintenance, and fuel expenses for the local plant;
  • Meet generating capacity planning and operation requirements to support the reliability of the regional power grid operated by the California Independent System Operator (CAISO); and
  • Provide a flexible generation source to accommodate unexpected changes in load or generation and provide backup for intermittent renewable resources like wind and solar.

Features and Benefits

  • Clean, highly efficient, natural-gas fueled 71 MW combined cycle unit 
  • Less emissions per kWh of energy produced
  • Rapid start and shut down, to generate electricity as needed
  • Provides a stable source of power as a backup for intermittent renewable resources
  • Lowers dependency on outside sources for energy
  • Lowers carbon footprint

How It Works

The upgraded unit will be a combined cycle unit that combines gas turbine and steam technologies into one unit. 

Gas Turbine
A gas turbine, similar to those used in jet airplanes, compresses air and mixes it with natural gas, then burns the resulting air-fuel mixture.  The combustion gas expands through the turbine blades which spin and drives the electric generator.  The generator converts mechanical energy into electricity.

Steam Turbine
Exhaust heat from the gas turbine passes into a once-through steam generator (OTSG).  The OTSG is a boiler that uses the heat from the exhaust gas to convert the water into steam.  The steam is then delivered to the steam turbine to produce additional energy for the generator, therefore creating additional electricity.